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Archive for March, 2011

Golden birthday banners keep wafting over my drawing board these days.  Don’t mind at all.  It’s a pleasure.

Dad fought at Iwo Jima in WWII.  He worked as a mailman.  He was a Bears fan way back when they played at Wrigley Field in the 50’s.  He has been a devoted Cubs fan all his life.  Now he likes to sit in his recliner and watch Wheel of Fortune.  How should I draw him?  Certainly not sitting in a chair.  I suggested that we go with the Cubs,  that we remind him of his energetic days.  Play ball!

When he sees this picture he will crack up.  He will notice his lean butt on the picture, his muscular calves, his smirk, his self-assurance in the picture and, of course, the fact that he hit that ball –like nothing.  He will laugh out loud, his arteries will dilate and he’ll experience a moment that no gift-wrapped flannel shirt can give him.  This is what makes the art of caricature unique. It really is a pleasure to be in this business.

Happy Birthday, Frank!

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

www.khilden.com

http://facefame.wordpress.com

http://artamaze.wordpress.com

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Dad has always played Hockey, loves it, follows the games, is a huge Blackhawks fan and is turning eighty.  His kids want to let him know that he’s a winner.  What better way to say that than to SHOW it—really, in a picture.

Now, the Stanley Cup is almost three feet high and weighs 34.5 lbs.  Holding it over your head after a victory is obviously very impressive and makes for a striking photo op.

The initial idea was to show him holding the Stanley Cup over his head.  In the art of caricature, the convention calls for the head being as big as the rest of the body and that means the arms will be too short to reach the top of the head.  Better not. Better have him leaning against the thing. This turned out to work very well, because it makes him, not a bragging, arm pumping kind of winner, but a gracious, easy, did-it-again kind of winner.  Yeah, dad, happy birthday!  Thumbs up!

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

www.khilden.com

http://facefame.wordpress.com

http://artamaze.wordpress.com

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At the Chic Chicago exhibit the third most popular dress after the Infanta (see post  1.29.11) was the evening gown by Charles Fredrick Worth, 1884, made in France.  Worth was an Englishman who set up shop in Paris in 1846, at the age of 21.  He dressed the aristocracy including the French empress Eugenie and the actor Sarah Bernhardt.  He is credited with starting haute couture, fashion shows with runways and the dictatorship of designers. The evening gown we had in the show was made of silk and velvet and was considered, in its day, to be quite daring because of its restraint and omission of decorations. To me it has a military look, despite the fact that the corset cinches the waist.  Another comparison that comes to mind is that the woman is behind bars.  The slavish status of women at that time was clearly reflected in the fashion.  You can argue that this was a step towards greater freedom of movement from the hoop skirts of the 1860’s but, clearly, we had a long way to go.

Ann Hollander, in her book “Seeing Through Clothes,” says that at any time in history the clothes that people wear are thought to be natural to the body.  If that’s true, then the Victorians had a pretty perverse notion of nature.

The women who chose to be drawn in this gown were either getting in touch with their inner submissive scullery maid or the madam of a house, or they had a riotous sense of humor about the dress and what it stood for.  As you can see from my adaptation of Mr. Worth’s creation, I fell in with the riotous crowd. ———————————————-

 

 

 

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All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

www.khilden.com

http://facefame.wordpress.com

http://artamaze.wordpress.com

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Corvette Lover

They called it the King of the Hill.  That’s the ZR-1 Corvette, 1990.  It was only twenty years old, but dad could not quite keep it up.  The roads in Wyoming can be rough.  Long story… and I did not get all of it…Brad, in Chicago, inherited it.  He was ecstatic.  His girlfriend, Tracey, thought this year, the birthday card should have the Corvette in it. Happy Birthday, Brad!

 

I could draw Corvette’s every day, all year round!

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

www.khilden.com

http://facefame.wordpress.com

http://artamaze.wordpress.com

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Mama Mia

What to give the woman who has everything (and too much of some parts) and who is known to love partying in an uninhibited way and who also happens to be your boss and who you’re going to The House of Blues with tomorrow on her birthday along with a bunch of riotous friends.…hmm, what to give her,  let’s see,  what would make her throw her head back and laugh uproariously the way she tends to do…geez, good thing you’re friends, because what you’ve come up with for a gift is…THIS.

Marta is the nanny to Cecilia’s kids. So, technically, Cecilia is the boss. But who cares about that.   When Marta picked up this drawing today (done from photos)  she was delighted.  It really does look like Cecilia, she said. Right, that would be true of the face; the rest is,  errrrmm,  artistic license,  considering the alterations in the figure– all in accordance with fantasy specs.  Marta will present the drawing in a fine wooden frame, nicely sealed and behind glass.  That’s good, because at this birthday party the beverages will sparkle like the guest of honor.  Happy birthday, Cecilia! (Not her real name, but close)

www.khilden.com

http://facefame.wordpress.com

http://artamaze.wordpress.com

All contents copyright (C) 2010 Katherine Hilden. All rights reserved.

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